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Appendix D

Survey response rate by sample strata
# of Sampled Counties Total Response Response Rate Percent
20 Rural Counties 158 60%
6 Suburban Counties 171 74%
4 Urban Counties 278 45%
Total 607 55%


Response rate by county
County Name Response Rate Percent County Name Response Rate Percent
Allegany 79% Orleans 42%
Broome 67% Putnam 100%
Cayuga 75% Rensselaer 93%
Chautauqua 84% Rockland 100%
Chemung 56% St. Lawrence 38%
Clinton 62% Steuben 48%
Cortland 53% Suffolk 75%
Erie 52% Sullivan 61%
>Fulton 100% Tompkins 48%
Genesee 35% Warren/ Hamilton 100%
Jefferson 100% Washington 100%
Madison 88% Westchester 33%
Oneida 80% Wyoming 77%
Onondaga 46% Yates 62%
Orange 75% NYC 45%
       
Total
55%

Appendix E

Sample Weighting Scheme8

The survey employed a multiple-stage sample design. In stage one, Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs) were grouped into three strata: urban, rural and suburban strata.  Then a sample of 50% of AAAs was selected in the second stage.  In stage three, a sample of caregivers within each sampled AAA were randomly selected.

Weighting of each caregiver was computed by taking the inverse of the selection probability for each sampled caregivers and adjusted for non-response.  It was done in two steps: calculation of base weights and non-response adjustment.

Base Weights

The base weight is the inverse of the overall selection probability of a caregiver. The base weight of a caregiver can be obtained by calculating the base weight of an AAA and multiplying that weight by the within-AAA-level base weight of a caregiver in the caregiver support program within that AAA.

The base weight of an AAA  can be expressed as
Formula for

and the base weight of a caregiver in a caregiver support program within an AAA can be expressed as
Formula for base weight of a caregiver in a caregiver support program within an AAA

The basic weight can be expressed as first part = second part

Non-response Adjustment

If Non-response Adjustment denotes the number of caregivers that responded to the survey, then the non-response adjustment was calculated as follows: forumula for non-response adjustment



8 This scheme is developed based on the technical documentation of the third Administration on Aging’s National Survey.


Appendix F

Methodology of Estimating Economic Value

The following three approaches were used for estimating the value of caregiving provided by caregivers in the NYSOFA/AAA caregiver support programs and services.

Approach I applies the 1999 Kaiser Family Foundation study’s methodology (Arno, 1999) to estimate the economic values per hour of caregiving. The hourly value of caregiving is estimated as the average of the state minimum wage of 2008 ($7.15), plus the 2008 Medicaid pay rate of personal care I ($19.36) and II ($19.67) that amounts to $15.39 per hour.  Therefore, if the work of these caregivers had to be replaced by what would be paid to the home care staff, the total caregiving costs to New York State would be $23 million per week or $1.2 billion per year.

Approach II applies the 2008 AARP report’s methodology (Houser, Gibson, 2008) to estimate the economic values per hour of caregiving. The hourly value of caregiving is estimated as the weighted average of the state minimum wage, state home health aide median wage and the average private hourly rate for hiring a home health aide. The estimated hourly rate, according to AARP’s report is $10.61. Therefore, if the work of these caregivers had to be replaced by what would be paid to the home care staff, the total caregiving value would be about $16 million a week and close to $832 million per year.

Approach III applies a special methodology developed by the New York State Office for the Aging, in which it assumes that for those caregivers who reported that they provided 168 hours a week of care to their care receivers a mix of different types of care (e.g., ADL assistance, IADL assistance, and non-hands-on supervision) were provided. Therefore, the following steps were taken:

  1. Separate those who stated that they provide 168 hours per week (24 hours a day, 7 days a week) assistance from those who do not provide around the clock help.
  2. For those who provide 168 hours per week (24 hours a day, 7 days a week) assistance, the 2008 Medicaid live-in assistance payment rate was used to calculate the economic value of the around the clock care.
  3. For those who do not provide around the clock assistance, an average number of hours of assistance was calculated and used to estimate the total hours of assistance provided by this group of caregivers per year. The total hours of care were then multiplied by the estimated number of caregivers who do not provide around-the-clock care.
  4. The total value of caregiving is estimated by adding the value resulted from step 2 and step 3. This resulted in an estimated caregiving value of $11.4 million a week and more than $590 million a year.
Range of Estimates from the for the Economic Value of Caregiving of Informal Caregivers in NYSOFA/AAA caregiver support programs and services
  Number of Caregivers (24,073)
Approach I ($15.39/hr)1 $1,206,259,000
Approach II ($10.61/hr)2 $831,425,378
Approach III (mixed rate)3 $590,196,219

  1. Calculated based on the 1999 Kaiser Family Foundation study’s methodology (see approach I).
  2. Based on AARP’s estimate of hourly value for New York (see approach II)
  3. Based on 2008 Medicaid day rate of $221.1 for caregivers providing around the clock care, plus the hourly rate of $15.39 (approach I) for the remainder of the caregivers (see approach III).

Appendix G

New York State Office for the Aging
Caregiver Support Programs Participants Survey Instrument

Use this link to access a copy of the survey instrument